Banner
Home → Best Practices

Best Practices
Finding the World's Unknown Viruses - Before They Find Us Print E-mail
Written by Helen Branswell | STAT   
Tuesday, 13 December 2016 18:14

One by one, the viruses have slipped from their hiding places in nature to threaten global populations - SARS, MERS, Zika.

In each case, scientists have scrambled to identify the viruses and to develop vaccines or drugs to stop their spread. After each crisis, the assessment has been the same: Countermeasures were not ready in time to help in the containment effort.

"Always too late," said Jonna Mazet, a scientist at the University of California, Davis, who is keen to break the bugs' winning streak. "We need to think about something different."

Mazet is a key player in an ambitious endeavor called the Global Virome Project, which has proposed cataloguing nearly all of the unknown viruses lurking in nature around the world. In a nutshell, Mazet and other experts want to search out mystery threats before they find us.

Read More

Last Updated on Monday, 09 January 2017 19:03
 
Watch for the Signs: Screen All Patients for Suicidal Thoughts Print E-mail
Written by The Doctors Company   
Thursday, 08 December 2016 00:00

The suicide of a patient is a tragedy for any physician.

Patients with suicidal thoughts or ideation appear occasionally in physician encounters. The Joint Commission recently noted that the rate of suicide is increasing, and suicide is now the 10th leading cause of death in the United States.1 Most people who commit suicide received healthcare services in the year prior to death, usually for reasons other than mental health issues or suicidal thoughts. It's a strong reminder that any patient-no matter what issue is being treated and in any setting-could be at risk for suicide.

The patient's well-being should be the primary concern, but physicians also must consider the potential legal liability that can come from failing to adequately screen patients for suicide risk and taking the proper steps when needed. The remorse a physician may face over missing signs can be compounded by legal action claiming the physician is accountable for the patient's demise. A consistent and formal screening process, plus a response plan, will protect both the patient and the physician.

Read More>>
 
Whistleblowers in Health Care- What's a Company To Do? Print E-mail
Written by Anne Novick Branan   
Thursday, 24 November 2016 00:00

Joe, the Practice Manager at a local medical group, cringed as he spied Susan, one of the nurses at the practice, marching toward him with an anxious, yet determined, look on her face. About two months ago, Susan confided in Joe that she heard that certain physicians in the medical group were accepting expensive sports event tickets from diagnostic centers to which the physicians frequently referred patients.

Read More

Last Updated on Friday, 25 November 2016 17:44
 
Facing Addiction in America Print E-mail
Written by FHInews   
Monday, 21 November 2016 18:31

U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, MD, MBA released a landmark report on the country's addiction crisis on 11/17/16 entitled The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health.

According to the author:

Substance use disorders represent one of the most pressing public health crises of our time...Fifty years ago, the landmark Surgeon General's report on the dangers of smoking began a half century of work to end the tobacco epidemic and saved millions of lives. With The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, I am issuing a new call to action to end the public health crisis of addiction.

Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>>

Last Updated on Monday, 12 December 2016 14:59
 
Their brains had the telltale signs of Alzheimer's. So why did they still have nimble minds? Print E-mail
Written by Sharon Begley | STAT   
Tuesday, 15 November 2016 19:06

The defective proteins that are widely thought to kill brain neurons and cause, or at least indicate, Alzheimer's disease do not always have that calamitous result, scientists reported on Monday, raising more doubts about conventional approaches to diagnosing and finding treatments for Alzheimer's.
 
The researchers analyzed the brains of eight people who died in their 90s and who had excellent recall until then. Three of the eight brains had the defining amyloid plaques and tau tangles of Alzheimer's, yet somehow were "immune to [their] effects," said neurologist Changiz Geula, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who led the study and presented the results at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego. "What's significant about these findings is that they show there can be high densities of plaques and tangles in the brains of some elderly individuals who are cognitively normal or even superior."

Read More
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 3 of 55


Banner
Website design, development, and hosting provided by
Netphiles