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What are the drivers of the Cigna-Expres Scripts merger? Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 12 March 2018 17:39

Cigna's CEO cited altruistic motivations for the acquisition of Exprss Scripts. Industry insiders believe there is more than philanthropy in the latest healthcare merger announced Friday. Read more in the latest edition of Week in Review>>

Last Updated on Monday, 12 March 2018 17:48
Ten ERs In Colorado Tried To Curtail Opioids And Did Better Than Expected Print E-mail
Written by John Daley, Colorado Public Radio via KHN   
Tuesday, 27 February 2018 18:34

DENVER - One of the most common reasons patients head to an emergency room is pain. In response, doctors may try something simple at first, like ibuprofen or acetaminophen. If that wasn't effective, the second line of defense has been the big guns. "Percocet or Vicodin," explained ER doctor Peter Bakes of Swedish Medical Center, "medications that certainly have contributed to the rising opioid epidemic." Now, though, physicians are looking for alternatives to help cut opioid use and curtail potential abuse. Ten Colorado hospitals, including Swedish in Englewood, Colo., participated in a six-month pilot project designed to cut opioid use, the Colorado Opioid Safety Collaborative.

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AI Rifles and Future Shootings Print E-mail
Written by Bill Gardner | The Incidental Economist   
Friday, 23 February 2018 16:58

The scale and frequency of mass killings have been increasing, and this is likely to continue. One reason - but just one - is that weapons are always getting more lethal. One of the next technical innovations in small arms will be the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to improve the aiming of weapons. There is no reason for civilians to have this technology and we should ban it now. By lethality, I mean how many people you can kill in a short period. Lethality depends on many factors, including the weapon's rate of fire, but not just that. Depending on the circumstances, a shooter with a highly accurate bolt-action rifle may be able to...

Complicated Communication: Discussing Unexpected Outcomes with Patients Print E-mail
Written by Marshaleen King, MD | Mutual Matters   
Tuesday, 13 February 2018 19:14

Case Scenario
A 32-year-old woman underwent emergency cesarean section due to fetal bradycardia. Her C-section was complicated by an injury to her bladder which was repaired immediately by her obstetrician. Post-operatively, the patient was not informed of this complication as the obstetrician reasoned that this was included as a possible complication on the consent form. In addition, the obstetrician was of the opinion that the bladder repair was successful thus the patient was unlikely to experience any future problems related to this complication.
Ten days following delivery the patient presented to her primary care physician complaining that an increasing amount of fluid was draining continuously from her vagina. The patient's primary care physician examined her and reviewed the records that had been faxed over by the obstetrician following her delivery.

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 13 February 2018 19:15
Usage remains low for HIV infection prevention pill Print E-mail
Written by AP via STAT   
Tuesday, 09 January 2018 19:09
Marketed in the United States as Truvada, and sometimes available abroad in generic versions, the pill has been shown to reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90 percent if taken daily. Yet worldwide, only about a dozen countries have aggressive, government-backed programs to promote the pill. In the U.S., there are problems related to Truvada's high cost, lingering skepticism among some doctors, and low usage rates among black gays and bisexuals who have the highest rates of HIV infection.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 09 January 2018 19:16
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