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Johns Hopkins removes three more All Children's Hospital leaders Print E-mail
Written by Modern Healthcare   
Tuesday, 08 January 2019 14:10
 
John Hopkins Medicine has removed three more senior administrators at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg, FL, after reported dramatic increases in the hospital's death rates for pediatric heart surgeries. The system also announced Wednesday that it had hired three external medical experts to develop a plan to restart the halted heart surgery program at the Florida hospital, which Johns Hopkins took over in 2011. In addition, Johns Hopkins Health System president Kevin Sowers, who has temporarily taken over leadership of All Children's, pointed to the system's hotline...
 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 January 2019 14:13
 
Big Win for Hospitals: Court Rejects 340B Payment Cuts Print E-mail
Written by Healthcare Dive   
Saturday, 05 January 2019 10:49
 
U.S. District Court Judge Rudolph Contreras has decided against the Trump administration in its plan to cut 340B payments for outpatient drugs that took effect in January 2018. Contreras said HHS didn't have legal authority to reduce payments and sidestepped Congressional authority. The American Hospital Association (AHA), America's Essential Hospitals (AEH) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) sued after HHS made the cuts. The groups said the government "exceeded its statutory authority when it cut Medicare reimbursement rates for certain outpatient pharmaceutical drugs by nearly 30%."
 

Last Updated on Friday, 01 March 2019 14:54
 
Opioid-Makers Face Multiple Lawsuits in the New Year Print E-mail
Written by Brian Mann | Health News Florida   
Tuesday, 01 January 2019 00:00
 
The next 12 months might just redefine the way America thinks about and responds to the opioid epidemic that now claims more than 40,000 lives each year. The nation's  biggest drugmakers and distributors face a wave of civil lawsuits that could total tens of billions of dollars in damages. Thousands of state and local governments, including cities and tribal governments, are demanding that companies like Purdue Pharma, Walmart and Rite-Aid compensate them for the costs of responding to the crisis. They're also pushing companies to reveal far more internal documents, detailing what they knew about the risks of prescription pain medications.

"Our next battle is to get the documents that are being produced made available to the public instead of everything being filed under confidentiality agreements so we can get the facts out," said Joe Rice, an attorney representing local governments suing the drug industry.
 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 02 January 2019 13:30
 
Healthcare Is Where the Jobs Are. But What Kind of Jobs? Print E-mail
Written by Rachel Bluth | KHN   
Saturday, 22 December 2018 09:10
 
More Americans are now employed in healthcare than in any other industry. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, which tallies job creation, says that for most of this year the  health sector outpaced the retail industry. Only government, on all levels, employs more people. One of the consistent features of the BLS reports is that health care has reliably added thousands of jobs to the economy each month. November was no different. The health care industry created 32,000 jobs, adding to the 328,000 health care positions created since early 2017. But what kinds of jobs? Were they highly paid doctors and hospital executives or were they positions on the other end of the pay scale, such as nursing home aides and the people who enter data for billing in hospitals and clinics?
 

Last Updated on Saturday, 22 December 2018 09:13
 
Federal Judge in Texas Overturns ACA Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 17 December 2018 00:00
 
Late in the day Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 multiple media outlets reported the shocking news. Peter Sullivan reports for The Hill:
A federal judge in Texas on Friday struck down the Affordable Care Act, throwing a new round of uncertainty into the fate of the law just one day before the deadline to sign up for coverage for next year. U.S. District Court Judge Reed O'Connor ruled that the law's individual mandate is unconstitutional, and that because the mandate cannot be separated from the rest of the law, the rest of the law is also invalid...The reasoning of the ruling states that in 2012, the Supreme Court upheld the mandate to have coverage because of Congress's power to tax. But, last year, Congress removed the fine for failing to comply with the mandate, which, he <O'Connor> argues, means the mandate is no longer a tax and therefore is unconstitutional.
Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>> https://conta.cc/2Evy17m
 
Last Updated on Friday, 25 January 2019 17:25
 
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