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Death By 1,000 Clicks: Where Electronic Health Records Went Wrong Print E-mail
Written by Fred Schulte and Erika Fry | Fortune via KHN   
Friday, 22 March 2019 17:33
 
Electronic health records were supposed to do a lot: make medicine safer, bring higher-quality care, empower patients, and yes, even save money. Boosters heralded an age when researchers could harness the big data within to reveal the most effective treatments for disease and sharply reduce medical errors. Patients, in turn, would have truly portable health records, being able to share their medical histories in a flash with doctors and hospitals anywhere in the country - essential when life-and-death decisions are being made in the ER.

But 10 years after President Barack Obama signed a law to accelerate the digitization of medical records - with the federal government, so far, sinking $36 billion into the effort - America has little to show for its investment. KHN and Fortune spoke with more than 100 physicians, patients, IT experts and administrators, health policy leaders, attorneys, top government officials and representatives at more than a half-dozen EHR vendors, including the CEOs of two of the companies. The interviews reveal a tragic missed opportunity: Rather than an electronic ecosystem of information, the nation's thousands of EHRs largely remain a sprawling, disconnected patchwork. Moreover, the effort has handcuffed health providers to technology they mostly can't stand and has enriched and empowered the $13-billion-a-year industry that sells it.
 
 
Last Updated on Friday, 22 March 2019 17:59
 
Three or more eggs a week increase your risk of heart disease and early death, study says Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 18 March 2019 16:57
 
A study published Friday, 3/15/19 in the medical journal JAMA delivers bad news for egg lovers. According the researchers, among 29,615 adults pooled from 6 prospective cohort studies in the United States with a median follow-up of 17.5 years, each additional 300 mg of dietary cholesterol consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality, and each additional half an egg consumed per day was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality. The researchers adjusted for the fact that egg consumption may be associated with unhealthy behaviors, such as low physical activity, smoking, or an unhealthy diet.
 
Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>> https://conta.cc/2F9RokZ
 
Last Updated on Monday, 18 March 2019 17:07
 
FL Senate Signs Off On Smokable Marijuana Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 11 March 2019 18:33
 
Dara Kam reports for News Service of Florida via Health News Florida on  Mar 8, 2019:
Bowing to a demand by Gov. Ron DeSantis, the Florida Senate on Thursday <3.7.19> overwhelmingly approved a measure that would allow patients to smoke medical marijuana if doctors deem it the proper treatment. Under the proposal, patients could buy up to 2.5 ounces of medical pot during a 35-day period and would be able to possess up to 4 ounces of cannabis at any given time. Smoking of medical cannabis --- which would have to be purchased from state-authorized operators --- would be banned in public places. The Senate's 34-4 vote in favor of the measure (SB 182) came two days after the start of the 2019 legislative session, and the House is expected to take up the measure Wednesday <3.13.19>.
Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>> https://conta.cc/2EW0kdt
 
Last Updated on Monday, 11 March 2019 18:38
 
Pharma Execs Dig in for a Fight Against Outraged Senators Print E-mail
Written by Emmarie Huetteman, Jay Hancock | KHN   
Wednesday, 27 February 2019 00:00
 
Senators got their first opportunity Tuesday to prod drugmakers about the wallet-emptying prices they charge for prescription drugs. Almost in unison, the executives expressed support for eliminating rebates that flow to industry middlemen instead of patients; for increasing transparency about how they set prices; for shifting to a more value-based pricing system, in which outcomes are rewarded. Together they demurred when asked to commit to lowering list prices on drugs like insulin and the blockbuster rheumatoid arthritis drug Humira. The drugmakers - AbbVie, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Pfizer and Sanofi - appeared before the Senate Finance Committee as lawmakers mull how to best control rising drug prices. 
 
 
Sponsor Showcase Print E-mail
Written by Sponsor   
Wednesday, 27 February 2019 00:00
 
bdo-ftl hc florida-health-industry ad 1-19
Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 February 2019 18:05
 


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